July 2017 - BabyQ

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What Do I Need to Do to Prepare for Breastfeeding?

Posted by | Lifestyle, Pregnancy Medicine | No Comments

Breastfeeding is the number one recommended way to feed infants and provide them with the nutrition their bodies need for healthy growth and development. Pregnant moms can take several steps in order to prepare themselves for breastfeeding their babies after birth. Prepare for Breastfeeding Long before your baby arrives, you are focusing on what to eat when you’re pregnant, which medications to use or avoid, and how to decorate the nursery. It is also a great time to prepare for breastfeeding. In fact, your body is already doing a bit of the preparation work for you. Your milk ducts are forming. Your breasts are growing in size. Blood flow is increased to the breasts. You might start to notice colostrum leaking from your nipples as labor nears. This is a highly nutritious and valuable milk for your baby. As your body is doing this work to prepare for feeding your…

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I’m Afraid I’m Gaining Too Much Weight and Will Never Lose It!

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It is one of the shared experiences of pregnancy – weight gain. The healthy development of your growing baby requires that your body adds extra weight, not just for the weight of your baby, but for things such as increases in blood volume and other body fluids. While every woman’s experience and health needs will be different, there are some general weight gain guidelines (as described by the Mayo Clinic) for typical pregnancies of a single growing baby. Underweight pre-pregnancy weight = recommended gain of 28-40 pounds Normal pre-pregnancy weight = recommended gain of 25-35 pounds Overweight pre-pregnancy weight = recommended gain of 15-25 pounds Obese pre-pregnancy weight = recommended gain of 11-20 pounds As you can see, even women who are considered obese at the beginning of their pregnancy typically need to gain at least 11 pounds in order to support the pregnancy. For those women who are carrying…

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How Much Does a Baby Cost?

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How Does the Cost for Hospital Delivery Compare with Delivery at a Birth Center? The US government organization, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Healthcare Utilization Project offers the following hospital cost statistics: Vaginal birth no complications – $9,617 to $10,657 Vaginal birth with complications – $12,532 to $13,749 C-section no complication – $15,799 to $17,859 C-section with complications – $21,495 – $23,923 The American Association of Birth Centers claims that the cost for a vaginal delivery at a birth center is $2,777. How much will it cost to raise my child? The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2012 Expenditures on Children by Families reports that parents with an annual household income between $59,410 and $102,870 can expect to spend $295,560 per child born in 2011 until the age of 17; while parents with an annual household income of less than $59,410 can expect to spend $169,080 per…

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Dieting and Pregnant—Is it safe?

Posted by | LENS, Nutrition, Pregnancy Medicine | No Comments

Proper nutrition is essential to a healthy pregnancy.  The diet of a pregnant woman should include recommended daily amounts of foods from each food group, including four or more servings of vegetables, two to four servings of fruits, four servings of dairy products, six to eleven servings of breads and grains, and three servings of protein sources, to ensure uptake of essential vitamins and minerals.  In addition, pregnant women are often encouraged to incorporate a prenatal vitamin and mineral supplement into their diet. The caloric intake of pregnant women should be greater than that of non-pregnant women with pregnant women consuming 2,500 calories a day. In general, this is 100 to 300 more calories for pregnant women. Thus, although pregnant women are not actually “eating for two”, an increased caloric intake is necessary to “fuel” the growing nutritional and developmental needs of expectant mothers and babies. Such food consumption sets…

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What are Prenatal Hiccups?

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Synopsis: What are prenatal hiccups and should moms be worried? Prenatal hiccups are a very common and normal phenomenon of the developing fetus. The expectant mother generally feels prenatal hiccups in the second trimester, although they may occur earlier and generally taper off early in the third trimester. What’s happening during prenatal hiccups? This spontaneous movement occurs after the central nervous system reaches maturity in utero, when the fetus gains the capability to make “breathing” type movements in and out. The fetus sucks in and expels some of the surrounding amniotic fluid. At this point, the muscle separating the fetal chest and abdominal cavities rapidly contracts, resulting in a hiccup. Hiccups do not appear to cause any discomfort to the fetus and oxygen is still being amply supplied via the unbillical cord. What will I feel when my unborn child hiccups? When a fetus hiccups, the pregnant mother often feels small, repeated…

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Due In A Week

Posted by | Pregnancy Lifestyle | No Comments

Today marks the final week (fingers crossed) of my pregnancy.  I’ve mentioned before that I was past due and induced with both Jack and Charlie; I don’t think I’ll be one of the fortunate ones who gets to deliver even a few days early.  I’m bound to be past due, hot, and swollen until the very end! It’s 92 degrees and humid here.  I’m ready.  I spent the past weekend on Lake Michigan with my family trying to go into labor – eating pineapple, marching up and down stairs, taking walks, and plenty of ankle massages from my husband.  No luck.  I even tried paddle boarding! I’ve previously said that I feel like I’m missing out on the big, theatrical  ‘Honey, it’s time!’ kind of moment, but my OB assured me that’s not really how it happens.  After delivering two other babies by induction, at least I know what to expect…

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Should I Have My Vitamin D Levels Checked?

Posted by | LENS, Nutrition, Pregnancy Medicine | No Comments

If you are pregnant you have probably heard many times the value of making sure you take your prenatal vitamins and get enough nutrients in your diet. Vitamin D is an especially important vitamin to the health of your unborn baby. Why Do I Need Vitamin D? Vitamin D has many jobs for you and the health of your baby. It regulates the necessary levels of calcium and phosphorus, which in turn helps to build your baby’s bones and teeth. If you do not have enough vitamin D your baby is at risk for skeletal malformations and retarded growth, impacting the healthy birth weight needed to get your infant started on the right track. Pregnancy puts a lot of demands on your body, and if you lack vitamin D during this time you can be at an increased risk of developing preeclampsia – which is highlighted by high blood pressure,…

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The Anti-Craving

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Cravings seem to be a topic people are highly concerned about when talking with pregnant women. I think anyone who hasn’t been pregnant is curious to hear some crazy concoction, and those who have been pregnant want to compare crazy concoctions. As far as specific cravings go, the only thing I can remember that was “weird” was the grilled cheese sandwich I once made with raspberry jam on it; but I don’t even think it was that weird because fruit and cheese are a very common combination. Anyway, it was delicious and Jack liked it too. During my first pregnancy I had a change in preferred tastes. I used to have a huge sweet tooth, but as soon as I got pregnant with Jack, I didn’t care for desserts or sweets anymore. I wanted salty foods, mostly olives, constantly. Then, during my second pregnancy, I only wanted chocolate all day,…

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How can I use my Microwave safely while Pregnant?

Posted by | LENS, Nutrition, Pregnancy Medicine | No Comments

Pregnancy is a busy time for expectant mothers to care for themselves and to prepare for their developing baby. With their increased daily demands, often times pregnant women find themselves rushing to consume meals that are quickly prepared. Such “fast food” is typically cooked or heated in a microwave oven. Microwave ovens work by vibrating water molecules in food and producing heat that cooks the food. Foods with large amounts of water like fresh vegetables cook faster than other foods with less water. Microwave ovens change their energy into heat that is absorbed by the food. The molecular structure of food is not altered, thus microwave cooking does not make food “radioactive” or “contaminated.” As well, there is no evidence that microwave cooking reduces the nutritional value of foods any more than conventional cooking. Quite the contrary, microwave cooking may retain more vitamins and minerals in foods since microwave ovens…

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