Dr. Mark Gostine, Author at BabyQ

Exercise During Pregnancy

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How much you need to exercise during pregnancy depends on many factors, including: Your pre-pregnancy weight The amount of time you are on your feet during the day If you have diabetes or develop gestational diabetes Your age Your gestational age Let’s examine each factor. If you are near ideal weight at the time you become pregnant exercise will be less of an issue. If you are overweight exercise can reduce excessive weight gain. Too much weight gain can increase your risk of gestational diabetes. This can actually program the child in your womb for diabetes as an adult or adolescent. However, too much exercise is not good either. Studies have shown that if you are on your feet during pregnancy more than 5 hours a day, you do not need additional exercise. You can actually overdo it and deliver less nutrition to your baby. Keep that in mind so…

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Correlation between flu vaccines and increases in miscarriage

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Question: Has babyQ reviewed any of the information reported by V.A.E.R.S. about any correlation between the flu vaccine that contains H1N1 and increases in miscarriage? Is there validity to this? Answer: Here is the summary statement from the Journal of Human and Experimental Toxicology dated  September 27, 2012: The unadjusted fetal-loss report rates for the three consecutive influenza seasons beginning 2008/2009 were 6.8 (95% CI: 0.1–13.1), 77.8 (95% CI: 66.3–89.4), and 12.6 (95% CI: 7.2–18.0) cases per million pregnant women vaccinated, respectively. . Thus, a synergistic fetal toxicity likely resulted from the administration of both the pandemic (A-H1N1) and seasonal influenza vaccines during the 2009/2010 season. It appears the multifold rise in miscarriages was primarily in women who received both vaccines, not specifically H1N1, according to the conclusion in the abstract on the web site.  We do know that women who suffer the flu during pregnancy have a slight increase in autism…

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Moods Changes

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There are a variety of reasons for your mood to become more fragile during pregnancy.  First, there are always the hormones.  They have a profound influence on your brain and can affect how you feel emotionally.  There is also the very real concern about having another mouth to feed and caring for a young child.  It’s obviously very joyful, but it can also be stressful.  The combination of hormones and real everyday worries can result in both depression and anxiety.  There are very good ways to treat this.  Your prenatal vitamins help stabilize moods, so does exercise.  Talking to friends and loved ones is key.   Counseling is very beneficial and effective. Prescription medications are rarely needed.  Getting outside during the day and letting the sun shine on your face can help with seasonal affective disorders and lift your spirits.  Support groups and exercise classes are also very helpful.

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What is Prenatal Care?

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Synopsis: This post/article explains what people mean when they refer to prenatal care. Prenatal care is preventive care recommended for women while they are pregnant. It is the best thing you can do to ensure a healthy pregnancy. Some women even choose to schedule a preconception visit to their health care professional when they are considering having a child. So what is prenatal care?  Prenatal care involves regularly scheduled check-ups and prenatal testing, which allow doctors or midwives to treat and prevent potential health problems during pregnancy. It also helps by providing guidance and promoting a healthy lifestyle to benefit both mother and baby. How often should I see my doctor? Prenatal care helps to keep you and your developing fetus healthy and sets the stage for a healthy life for your newborn–provided you go early and often. You should see your health care provider, family doctor, obstetrician, gynecologist or…

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Restless Legs

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Restless legs seem to bother a small number of women during pregnancy.  It is the sensation of always having to move your legs.  While you are sitting you may feel compelled to cross them, at night while you are trying to sleep, you may find it difficult to position your legs comfortably.  You feel you must keep moving them.  Restless leg is linked to iron deficiency in pregnancy. It is very important that you take your prenatal vitamins to help reduce the risk.  Also the tendency for restless legs seems to be genetically determined.  That is, you are more likely to suffer from restless leg syndrome if your father or mother had it.  Fortunately, it almost always goes away after your baby is delivered.

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Depression

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About 10% of pregnant women will have symptoms of depression.  Diet can be a factor.  Diets low in Omega 3 fatty acids seems to make individuals more prone to depression.  Fortunately, most prenatal vitamins contain DHA also known as an omega 3 fatty acids.  Omega 3 fatty acids are also found in seafood.  Eating high quality seafoods that are low in mercury, such as farm-raised trout, or wild Alaskan Salmon, are also excellent sources of omega 3 fatty acids.  Vitamin D deficiency can make you feel more depressed.  Vitamin D is the sunshine vitamin.  It is formed in your skin from sun exposure.  Make sure you get reasonable sun exposure during pregnancy.  If you cannot get outside regularly during the day, take 2000 units of Vitamin D a day as a pill.  Also to alleviate depression, talk to your friends and family about any issues bothering you.  Get regular exercise…

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Headaches

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Up to about 10% of women will experience headaches during your first trimester of pregnancy.  This is because your hormones are changing rapidly and your body is adapting.  Hormones have a definite impact on our headache frequency and severity.  For most pregnant women, headaches go away after the first trimester when their body has adapted to the hormonal changes.  Many women with chronic migraines report that their headaches actually improve during pregnancy, and again it’s the hormones. Progesterone is a protective hormone and it’s like a tonic for your brain.  It’s soothing and calming.  If you experience headaches, try to avoid taking any drugs, either over the counter, or prescription medications.  Stay well hydrated, drink plenty of water.  Make sure you’re not hypoglycemic, eat regularly and keep your diet well balanced by including adequate fruits and vegetables and high quality protein.  Try to avoid sugary snacks that make your blood…

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Does a mother's due date change?

Should I Be Worried That I’m Past My Due Date?

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How is My Due Date Calculated?  The most common way to calculate the date of delivery is Naegele’s Rule, a formula named after the German obstetrician Franz Karl Naegele who created it. Your ob-gyn doctor will ask you for the first day of your last period. He or she then adds nine months and seven days to that date. The end result is a due date about 280 days from the start of your last period. While this may be a simple way to calculate a due date, there are some problems with it. The accuracy of this method depends on: Your ability to correctly remember the first day of your last period You having regular menstrual cycles You not experiencing early bleeding that was not really the start of your cycle Your use of oral contraceptives, which could affect the timing of ovulation Another issue with this formula is…

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40 Weeks and Counting: Why the Length of Your Pregnancy Matters

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How long is a full-term pregnancy? Up until last month, a full-term pregnancy was considered anything from 37 to 42 weeks. This was based on the research that babies born in this timeframe tend to have a high survival rate with few complications. However, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has now changed the definition of a full-term pregnancy to only cover two weeks’ time: 39 weeks to 41 weeks. The main reason for the change is to eliminate the percentage of scheduled deliveries that occur before the 39-week mark. The new findings support the theory that weeks and days do matter in a pregnancy, and the time in the womb should not be cut short if unnecessary. However, if your baby is born naturally between 37 and 39 weeks, it still has a high survival rate and you should not worry too much. If your body goes into…

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Low Back Pain

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Low back pain is extremely common in pregnancy.  Over 50% of women experience it at some point.  It’s related to your changing body.  Your ligaments are loosening in preparation for delivery; this is secondary to hormonal influences.  Women who exercise three times or more a week seem to have less low back pain.  We recommend walking 30-45 minutes, three to five times per week to treat low back pain.  If the pain is severe you can seek treatment with a physical therapist or a chiropractor, but above all avoid any x-rays.  Tylenol may also be helpful for back pain.  We do not recommend you take it on a regular basis. It’s felt to be safe, but does not really change the underlying cause of the problem.  Almost all back pain resolves within six months after delivery.

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