Pregnancy Health Archives - BabyQ

Exercise During Pregnancy

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How much you need to exercise during pregnancy depends on many factors, including: Your pre-pregnancy weight The amount of time you are on your feet during the day If you have diabetes or develop gestational diabetes Your age Your gestational age Let’s examine each factor. If you are near ideal weight at the time you become pregnant exercise will be less of an issue. If you are overweight exercise can reduce excessive weight gain. Too much weight gain can increase your risk of gestational diabetes. This can actually program the child in your womb for diabetes as an adult or adolescent. However, too much exercise is not good either. Studies have shown that if you are on your feet during pregnancy more than 5 hours a day, you do not need additional exercise. You can actually overdo it and deliver less nutrition to your baby. Keep that in mind so…

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Correlation between flu vaccines and increases in miscarriage

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Question: Has babyQ reviewed any of the information reported by V.A.E.R.S. about any correlation between the flu vaccine that contains H1N1 and increases in miscarriage? Is there validity to this? Answer: Here is the summary statement from the Journal of Human and Experimental Toxicology dated  September 27, 2012: The unadjusted fetal-loss report rates for the three consecutive influenza seasons beginning 2008/2009 were 6.8 (95% CI: 0.1–13.1), 77.8 (95% CI: 66.3–89.4), and 12.6 (95% CI: 7.2–18.0) cases per million pregnant women vaccinated, respectively. . Thus, a synergistic fetal toxicity likely resulted from the administration of both the pandemic (A-H1N1) and seasonal influenza vaccines during the 2009/2010 season. It appears the multifold rise in miscarriages was primarily in women who received both vaccines, not specifically H1N1, according to the conclusion in the abstract on the web site.  We do know that women who suffer the flu during pregnancy have a slight increase in autism…

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What is Prenatal Care?

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Synopsis: This post/article explains what people mean when they refer to prenatal care. Prenatal care is preventive care recommended for women while they are pregnant. It is the best thing you can do to ensure a healthy pregnancy. Some women even choose to schedule a preconception visit to their health care professional when they are considering having a child. So what is prenatal care?  Prenatal care involves regularly scheduled check-ups and prenatal testing, which allow doctors or midwives to treat and prevent potential health problems during pregnancy. It also helps by providing guidance and promoting a healthy lifestyle to benefit both mother and baby. How often should I see my doctor? Prenatal care helps to keep you and your developing fetus healthy and sets the stage for a healthy life for your newborn–provided you go early and often. You should see your health care provider, family doctor, obstetrician, gynecologist or…

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Does a mother's due date change?

Should I Be Worried That I’m Past My Due Date?

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How is My Due Date Calculated?  The most common way to calculate the date of delivery is Naegele’s Rule, a formula named after the German obstetrician Franz Karl Naegele who created it. Your ob-gyn doctor will ask you for the first day of your last period. He or she then adds nine months and seven days to that date. The end result is a due date about 280 days from the start of your last period. While this may be a simple way to calculate a due date, there are some problems with it. The accuracy of this method depends on: Your ability to correctly remember the first day of your last period You having regular menstrual cycles You not experiencing early bleeding that was not really the start of your cycle Your use of oral contraceptives, which could affect the timing of ovulation Another issue with this formula is…

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40 Weeks and Counting: Why the Length of Your Pregnancy Matters

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How long is a full-term pregnancy? Up until last month, a full-term pregnancy was considered anything from 37 to 42 weeks. This was based on the research that babies born in this timeframe tend to have a high survival rate with few complications. However, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has now changed the definition of a full-term pregnancy to only cover two weeks’ time: 39 weeks to 41 weeks. The main reason for the change is to eliminate the percentage of scheduled deliveries that occur before the 39-week mark. The new findings support the theory that weeks and days do matter in a pregnancy, and the time in the womb should not be cut short if unnecessary. However, if your baby is born naturally between 37 and 39 weeks, it still has a high survival rate and you should not worry too much. If your body goes into…

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Why You Need Folic Acid in Your Pregnancy Diet

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What is Folic Acid? Folic acid is one of the B vitamins that occurs naturally in foods, like legumes, oranges, papayas, broccoli, spinach, cauliflower, asparagus, greens, dark lettuce and eggs. Foods high in folic acid are also high in other important vitamins and minerals. Folic acid is necessary for the growth of new cells. What Are the Benefits of Taking Folic Acid During Pregnancy? There are some important advantages that result from taking folic acid: It enhances fertility – In a study released in 2006,  American researchers reported their findings after having followed the progress of 18,500 nurses who planned to become pregnant over an eight-year period in the 1990s. The researchers evaluated the nurses’ diets including whether or not they took vitamin supplements. They found that the nurses taking multivitamins with folic acid six days a week or more had a 40 percent reduced risk of ovulation failure, a…

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subchorionic-hematoma

Should I Be Worried That I Was Diagnosed with Subchorionic Hemorrhage?

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What is Subchorionic Hemorrhage? This condition is also referred to as subchorionic hematoma. There is excessive bleeding and a collection of blood or hematoma that forms between the chorionic membrane surrounding the embryo, and the wall of the uterus. Subchorionic hemorrhage is caused because the membrane surrounding the embryo separates from the inner lining of the uterus. It is the most common cause of bleeding in the first trimester. How Does a Subchorionic Hemorrhage Affect My Baby? There are a number of factors that determine how this condition affects the baby including how large the hematoma is, the mother’s age and how far along the fetus is in its development. Older pregnant women with large amounts of bleeding have higher rates for miscarriage. Women who experience subchorionic hemorrhage in late first trimester or in second trimester also have an increased chance for miscarriage. Subchorionic hemorrhage also increase the risk for…

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How Much Does a Baby Cost?

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How Does the Cost for Hospital Delivery Compare with Delivery at a Birth Center? The US government organization, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Healthcare Utilization Project offers the following hospital cost statistics: Vaginal birth no complications – $9,617 to $10,657 Vaginal birth with complications – $12,532 to $13,749 C-section no complication – $15,799 to $17,859 C-section with complications – $21,495 – $23,923 The American Association of Birth Centers claims that the cost for a vaginal delivery at a birth center is $2,777. How much will it cost to raise my child? The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2012 Expenditures on Children by Families reports that parents with an annual household income between $59,410 and $102,870 can expect to spend $295,560 per child born in 2011 until the age of 17; while parents with an annual household income of less than $59,410 can expect to spend $169,080 per…

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